Aphex Twin - Selected Ambient Works 85-92

Selected Ambient Works 85–92 (or Selected Ambient Works 85 to 92) is the debut studio album by English electronic musician Aphex Twin (Richard D. James). His third release and under the alias, it was released in 1992 on the Belgian techno label Apollo. An analogue remaster was released in 2006, and a digital remaster was released in 2008. Selected Ambient Works 85–92 was appreciated for its minimalist and atmospheric nature and is considered by many music critics to be one of the greatest albums in ambientIDM, and electronic music.

A Kind of Guise

A Kind of Guise

vicemag:

We talked with Milton Arellano about his experience working with Levi’s Skateboarding to build Pura Pura, a skate park high up on the slopes of La Paz, Bolivia. Check out his story here.

everyoneeatscookies:

Anthony Pappalardo, from Converse Skateboarding introduction paper

jennilee:
Field Trip (via Elizabeth Weinberg on The Great Discontent (TGD))http://thegreatdiscontent.com/interview/elizabeth-weinberg

jennilee:

Field Trip (via Elizabeth Weinberg on The Great Discontent (TGD))

Name.

johnnysimon:

Thomas Prior traveled to Rwanda for MSNBC to document educational advances for rural children.  Check out the full essay here.

Mystery Train (1989) - Jim Jarmusch

Mystery Train is a 1989 independent anthology film written and directed by Jim Jarmusch and set in Memphis, Tennessee. The film comprises a triptych of stories involving foreign protagonists unfolding over the course of the same night. “Far From Yokohama” features a Japanese couple (played by Youki Kudoh and Masatoshi Nagase) on a blues pilgrimage, “A Ghost” focuses on an Italian widow (Nicoletta Braschi) stranded in the city overnight, and “Lost in Space” follows the misadventure of a newly single and unemployed Englishman (Joe Strummer) and his companions (Rick Aviles and Steve Buscemi). They are linked by a run-down flophouse overseen by a night clerk (played by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins) and his disheveled bellboy (Cinqué Lee), a scene featuring Elvis Presley's “Blue Moon”, and a gunshot.

Duke of Hawaii: A Swimmer and Surfer Who Straddled Two Cultures
Duke Kahanamoku, who won a total of five swimming medals in Olympics from 1912 to 1924, probably did more than anyone else to bring the sport of surfing from his native Hawaiian islands to the United States mainland. Almost in reverse, he also played a substantial part in the Americanization of old Hawaii.
Born in Honolulu in 1890, descended from patrician ancestors who counseled the Hawaiian monarchy, he grew up near Waikiki Beach as the son of a police captain. Duke was a child when Queen Liliuokalani was thrown under house arrest and Hawaii transformed, by aid of the United States Marines, into Uncle Sam’s territory.
With no outward hint of resentment toward those who had seized and subjugated his country, Duke sought and won a place on the American swimming team at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, the only Hawaiian present. The Philadelphia Inquirer sportswriter Edgar Forrest Wolfe (who used the pen name Jim Nasium) pronounced Kahanamoku in 1913 “a human fish” and “the greatest swimmer the world of sport has ever seen.”
Reflecting the condescension with which Americans of the period viewed Hawaiian culture, Wolfe wrote that Duke had started his career as “one of the brown naked kids” of Honolulu who “swim through the shark infested waters of the harbor in search of silver coins thrown from the docks of the incoming steamer.”…http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/23/upshot/duke-of-hawaii-a-swimmer-and-surfer-who-straddled-two-cultures.html?smid=fb-nytimes&WT.z_sma=UP_DOH_20140823&bicmp=AD&bicmlukp=WT.mc_id&bicmst=1388552400000&bicmet=1420088400000&_r=3&abt=0002&abg=0

Duke of Hawaii: A Swimmer and Surfer Who Straddled Two Cultures

Duke Kahanamoku, who won a total of five swimming medals in Olympics from 1912 to 1924, probably did more than anyone else to bring the sport of surfing from his native Hawaiian islands to the United States mainland. Almost in reverse, he also played a substantial part in the Americanization of old Hawaii.

Born in Honolulu in 1890, descended from patrician ancestors who counseled the Hawaiian monarchy, he grew up near Waikiki Beach as the son of a police captain. Duke was a child when Queen Liliuokalani was thrown under house arrest and Hawaii transformed, by aid of the United States Marines, into Uncle Sam’s territory.

With no outward hint of resentment toward those who had seized and subjugated his country, Duke sought and won a place on the American swimming team at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, the only Hawaiian present. The Philadelphia Inquirer sportswriter Edgar Forrest Wolfe (who used the pen name Jim Nasium) pronounced Kahanamoku in 1913 “a human fish” and “the greatest swimmer the world of sport has ever seen.”

Reflecting the condescension with which Americans of the period viewed Hawaiian culture, Wolfe wrote that Duke had started his career as “one of the brown naked kids” of Honolulu who “swim through the shark infested waters of the harbor in search of silver coins thrown from the docks of the incoming steamer.”