sawatakai:

sawa takai fall/winter campaign video is now up on our website.

www.sawatakai.com

sawa takai | fall / winter 2014

(Source: vimeo.com)

(via Potato Poem By Francis Upritchard)
New Zealand-born artist Francis Upritchard moved to London in 1998, and was selected to represent her native land at the Venice Biennale in 2009. Now internationally prominent, she is known for her vibrantly coloured and contorted figures, mixed appearances and tongue-in-cheek installations, at once puzzling and utterly captivating. In a way, her work honestly reflects the human experience given form through vague impressions, false memories and partial accounts. Published on the occasion of her first exhibition in Japan, at MIMOCA, the book features installation views, drawings, sculptures and texts by Simon Starling, David Mitchell and curator Katsura Kunieda.http://www.everyday-needs.com/products/potato-poem

(via Potato Poem By Francis Upritchard)

New Zealand-born artist Francis Upritchard moved to London in 1998, and was selected to represent her native land at the Venice Biennale in 2009. Now internationally prominent, she is known for her vibrantly coloured and contorted figures, mixed appearances and tongue-in-cheek installations, at once puzzling and utterly captivating. In a way, her work honestly reflects the human experience given form through vague impressions, false memories and partial accounts. Published on the occasion of her first exhibition in Japan, at MIMOCA, the book features installation views, drawings, sculptures and texts by Simon Starling, David Mitchell and curator Katsura Kunieda.

08sircus SS15

Dafy Hagai: Israeli Girlshttp://thisispaper.com/Dafy-Hagai-Israeli-Girls

Dafy Hagai: Israeli Girls

The women beekeepers of Cameroon - in pictures | World news | theguardian.com
Spotting an opportunity for women like her to earn a simple, additional income, Marianna Tanda Fumsi founded a cooperative of women beekeepers on the outskirts of Bamenda in north west Cameroon in 1997. Ever since, it has been helping women to sell honey to help pay for their children’s education.http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2014/jul/30/the-women-beekeepers-of-cameroon-in-pictures

The women beekeepers of Cameroon - in pictures | World news | theguardian.com

Spotting an opportunity for women like her to earn a simple, additional income, Marianna Tanda Fumsi founded a cooperative of women beekeepers on the outskirts of Bamenda in north west Cameroon in 1997. Ever since, it has been helping women to sell honey to help pay for their children’s education.

Goldie, When Saturn Returnz (1998)

Legendary.

(via Jennifer Kinney: City Under One Roof - Thisispaper Magazine)

"City Under One Roof is an incomplete portrait of a town and its many transitions, from a vitally patriotic World War II necessity to an obscure outpost, from a proud, young, isolated town to a middle aged one increasingly connected to the outside world. It is an invitation to engage with community identity: how it forms, how it changes, and how it is represented. The title refers to Whittier’s reality as a town of shared roofs and homes, where neighbours live so close together they can hear each other through the walls. It was a nickname for the once-grand Buckner Building, the largest building in Whittier and the Alaskan territory upon its construction, but abandoned just six years later. It is also a metaphor for the way we live in small communities: as a family, persisting in spite of difference and division.”http://thisispaper.com/Jennifer-Kinney-City-Under-One-Roof

(via Jennifer Kinney: City Under One Roof - Thisispaper Magazine)

"City Under One Roof is an incomplete portrait of a town and its many transitions, from a vitally patriotic World War II necessity to an obscure outpost, from a proud, young, isolated town to a middle aged one increasingly connected to the outside world. It is an invitation to engage with community identity: how it forms, how it changes, and how it is represented. The title refers to Whittier’s reality as a town of shared roofs and homes, where neighbours live so close together they can hear each other through the walls. It was a nickname for the once-grand Buckner Building, the largest building in Whittier and the Alaskan territory upon its construction, but abandoned just six years later. It is also a metaphor for the way we live in small communities: as a family, persisting in spite of difference and division.”

SOPHNET AW14

Engineered Garments SS15

A Refugee Crisis, Not an Immigration Crisis - NYTimes.com

CRISTIAN OMAR REYES, an 11-year-old sixth grader in the neighborhood of Nueva Suyapa, on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, tells me he has to get out of Honduras soon — “no matter what.”

In March, his father was robbed and murdered by gangs while working as a security guard protecting a pastry truck. His mother used the life insurance payout to hire a smuggler to take her to Florida. She promised to send for him quickly, but she has not.

Three people he knows were murdered this year. Four others were gunned down on a nearby corner in the span of two weeks at the beginning of this year. A girl his age resisted being robbed of $5. She was clubbed over the head and dragged off by two men who cut a hole in her throat, stuffed her panties in it, and left her body in a ravine across the street from Cristian’s house.

“I’m going this year,” he tells me.

I last went to Nueva Suyapa in 2003, to write about another boy, Luis Enrique Motiño Pineda, who had grown up there and left to find his mother in the United States. Children from Central America have been making that journey, often without their parents, for two decades. But lately something has changed, and the predictable flow has turned into an exodus. Three years ago, about 6,800 children were detained by United States immigration authorities and placed in federal custody; this year, as many as 90,000 children are expected to be picked up. Around a quarter come from Honduras — more than from anywhere else.

Children still leave Honduras to reunite with a parent, or for better educational and economic opportunities. But, as I learned when I returned to Nueva Suyapa last month, a vast majority of child migrants are fleeing not poverty, but violence. As a result, what the United States is seeing on its borders now is not an immigration crisis. It is a refugee crisis.

(Read More)