Malte Wandel: Please don’t smile - Thisispaper Magazinehttp://thisispaper.com/Malte-Wandel-Please-don-t-smile

Malte Wandel: Please don’t smile - Thisispaper Magazine

Gosha Rubchinskiy

Gosha Rubchinskiy

Edwin Smith online gallery curated by Margaret Howell
Above: Ideal’ fish and chip shop, London, 1958
'This is pure documentary and, for me, full of nostalgia. But what gives it life for all of us is the little girl in the corner looking right at the camera, enjoying her chips.'
'You can’t fault Edwin Smith’s eye. There’s not a single photograph in the RIBA’s extensive collection that is not beautifully composed. The way he captures the spirit of place takes me right there. I love that he chose subjects that seem modest, even unpromising, then transformed them with technical assurance and vision. His images of Britain have a truth I recognise and feel at one with.’http://www.architecture.com/Explore/ExhibitionsandEvents/EdwinSmith/Explore/MargaretHowell.aspx

Edwin Smith online gallery curated by Margaret Howell

Above: Ideal’ fish and chip shop, London, 1958

'This is pure documentary and, for me, full of nostalgia. But what gives it life for all of us is the little girl in the corner looking right at the camera, enjoying her chips.'

'You can’t fault Edwin Smith’s eye. There’s not a single photograph in the RIBA’s extensive collection that is not beautifully composed. The way he captures the spirit of place takes me right there. I love that he chose subjects that seem modest, even unpromising, then transformed them with technical assurance and vision. His images of Britain have a truth I recognise and feel at one with.’

ID Dailywear Crushable Hat

jennilee:
From early examples of books by Edward Steichen, to publications by Alec Soth and Tierney Gearon, photobooks for children are not a new phenomenon. Last year, The British Journal of Photography featured a report on a new wave of childrens’ books. It identified that, although children are engaging with the language of photography at an increasingly young age, it may be a difficult medium to use for the making of childrens’ books, as such publications encourage young readers to use their imaginations to build stories, and photography cannot escape its indexical or direct link to the world of fact. With this in mind, it is clear photography needs to be employed by childrens’ book makers in engaging and creative ways, teaching children not just to look at images but how to read them too, be them factual or fictional. Enter Jason Fulford. His typically playful approach to image-making has seen him create books that are puzzles; books that play with word association and books that invite us to solve visual conundrums. In This Equals That – his new book for children made in collaboration with graphic designer Tamara Shopsin and published by Aperture Foundation – he works with a similar formula. The clever pairing of images build a small encyclopaedia of visual associations and equations, and encourage readers to think about number, shape and colour and the lovely ways in which fragments of the world mirror each other and slot together. Though made as a childrens’ book, This Equals That is a puzzle that we can take pleasure in solving at any age, as we consider how the colours of flowers reflect those in stained glass windows, or the curve of an orange relates to a small hole in the sand. (via This Equals That: Jason Fulford and Tamara Shopsin | BLOG - The Photographers’ Gallery)http://thephotographersgalleryblog.org.uk/2014/09/10/this-equals-that-jason-fulford-and-tamara-shopsin/

jennilee:

From early examples of books by Edward Steichen, to publications by Alec Soth and Tierney Gearon, photobooks for children are not a new phenomenon. Last year, The British Journal of Photography featured a report on a new wave of childrens’ books. It identified that, although children are engaging with the language of photography at an increasingly young age, it may be a difficult medium to use for the making of childrens’ books, as such publications encourage young readers to use their imaginations to build stories, and photography cannot escape its indexical or direct link to the world of fact. With this in mind, it is clear photography needs to be employed by childrens’ book makers in engaging and creative ways, teaching children not just to look at images but how to read them too, be them factual or fictional. Enter Jason Fulford. His typically playful approach to image-making has seen him create books that are puzzles; books that play with word association and books that invite us to solve visual conundrums. In This Equals That – his new book for children made in collaboration with graphic designer Tamara Shopsin and published by Aperture Foundation – he works with a similar formula. The clever pairing of images build a small encyclopaedia of visual associations and equations, and encourage readers to think about number, shape and colour and the lovely ways in which fragments of the world mirror each other and slot together. Though made as a childrens’ book, This Equals That is a puzzle that we can take pleasure in solving at any age, as we consider how the colours of flowers reflect those in stained glass windows, or the curve of an orange relates to a small hole in the sand. (via This Equals That: Jason Fulford and Tamara Shopsin | BLOG - The Photographers’ Gallery)

Where to Find The Topless Gallery Owner | Alldayeveryday
Jenni Crain is the co-founder of Topless, a seasonal moving gallery that will open in and repair spaces damaged by Superstorm Sandy. The gallery, which was founded by Jenni and her partner, Brent Birnbaum, had its first season this summer in a space with water marks five feet high.http://www.alldayeveryday.com/articles/jenni-crain-public-library-broad-channel

Where to Find The Topless Gallery Owner | Alldayeveryday

Jenni Crain is the co-founder of Topless, a seasonal moving gallery that will open in and repair spaces damaged by Superstorm Sandy. The gallery, which was founded by Jenni and her partner, Brent Birnbaum, had its first season this summer in a space with water marks five feet high.

Coverchord ‘Stream of Consciousness’

Patagonia ‘Pataloha’ Tote

jennilee:

It’s finally here :o)

Window Seat - Jennilee Marigomen
Published by New Documents 
Edition of 500
Hardcover  / 22.8cm x 29.7cm / 64 pages / $35
Special edition of 25 with 8” x 11” print / $125
Printed in Korea
Editor: Jeff Khonsary
Text by: Nich McElroy / Copyeditor: Jaclyn Arndt
Proofs: Jason Fulford
Design: The Future