jennilee: High Noon - NOWNESShttp://www.nowness.com/day/2014/3/28/3770/high-noon

jennileeHigh Noon - NOWNESS

Margaret Howell MHL SS14

jennilee: 
Margaret Howell Says Keep as Much Control Over Design as Possible
"In 1977, Margaret Howell opened her first menswear shop with the help of Joseph on London’s South Molton Street. Then, in 1980, in response to demand from smart women who wanted modern suiting and who had been buying her men’s garments for themselves, she launched a womenswear line along with her first wholly owned store on St Christopher’s Place, near Bond Street. “Women would come in to buy the [men’s] jackets and trousers in the South Molton Street shop in the late 1970s in the Annie Hall period. I suppose the customers were mainly in the media, music business and films — that sort of thing — or working-women that needed to wear a suit. I think good quality tailoring for women wasn’t so easy to find, especially if it was more of a modern cut and that was where I came in really, modernising Jaeger and Burberry, things like that.” The company’s main womenswear line is now their best-selling collection, followed by their shirting.
Margaret Howell never went to fashion college. “For me, it was helpful to have not gone. I suppose my taste is quite conservative and I think fashion colleges can encourage madness. It was good for me, because I broke the rules in constructions and patterns: I used to start with a conventional pattern, but I would draw the sort of feeling I wanted to get into that piece of clothing, sort of like doing our own haircuts when we were teenagers. If you know what you want you can do it.”
Her taste in art bucked the trend among her contemporaries too. She was into figurative artists like Manet, Van Gogh and Constable, while her fellows at Goldsmiths were into more abstract art. And, on reflection, it’s perhaps her calm focus on practical pieces, rooted in tradition and rendered in colours and textures that are more evocative of natural surroundings than of urbane flights of fancy, that has given her brand lasting appeal.”http://www.businessoffashion.com/2014/03/margaret-howell-says-keep-much-control-design-possible.html

jennilee

Margaret Howell Says Keep as Much Control Over Design as Possible

"In 1977, Margaret Howell opened her first menswear shop with the help of Joseph on London’s South Molton Street. Then, in 1980, in response to demand from smart women who wanted modern suiting and who had been buying her men’s garments for themselves, she launched a womenswear line along with her first wholly owned store on St Christopher’s Place, near Bond Street. “Women would come in to buy the [men’s] jackets and trousers in the South Molton Street shop in the late 1970s in the Annie Hall period. I suppose the customers were mainly in the media, music business and films — that sort of thing — or working-women that needed to wear a suit. I think good quality tailoring for women wasn’t so easy to find, especially if it was more of a modern cut and that was where I came in really, modernising Jaeger and Burberry, things like that.” The company’s main womenswear line is now their best-selling collection, followed by their shirting.

Margaret Howell never went to fashion college. “For me, it was helpful to have not gone. I suppose my taste is quite conservative and I think fashion colleges can encourage madness. It was good for me, because I broke the rules in constructions and patterns: I used to start with a conventional pattern, but I would draw the sort of feeling I wanted to get into that piece of clothing, sort of like doing our own haircuts when we were teenagers. If you know what you want you can do it.”

Her taste in art bucked the trend among her contemporaries too. She was into figurative artists like Manet, Van Gogh and Constable, while her fellows at Goldsmiths were into more abstract art. And, on reflection, it’s perhaps her calm focus on practical pieces, rooted in tradition and rendered in colours and textures that are more evocative of natural surroundings than of urbane flights of fancy, that has given her brand lasting appeal.”

Patrik Ervell SS14 by Daniel Sannwald

Patrik Ervell SS14 by Daniel Sannwald

freundevonfreunden:
A portrait of Vito Acconci by Jonathan Harris
Vito Acconci, now 74, is a legendary figure in the art world. In the early 1970s he produced a series of performance art pieces that utilized his own body as both subject and tool.
In the mid-1970s, Vito stopped doing performances and turned to architecture - an area he has been committed to ever since. A couple of weeks ago Vito got married and his feelings have started to change.
Our good friend Jonathan Harris decided to make a little portrait of Vito after having spent a long period of time with him. It’s a weird and tiny little piece, but very intriguing, check it out here.
—
This is the coolest shit on the internet right now. So good.http://vetovito.net/

freundevonfreunden:

A portrait of Vito Acconci by Jonathan Harris

Vito Acconci, now 74, is a legendary figure in the art world. In the early 1970s he produced a series of performance art pieces that utilized his own body as both subject and tool.

In the mid-1970s, Vito stopped doing performances and turned to architecture - an area he has been committed to ever since. A couple of weeks ago Vito got married and his feelings have started to change.

Our good friend Jonathan Harris decided to make a little portrait of Vito after having spent a long period of time with him. It’s a weird and tiny little piece, but very intriguing, check it out here.

This is the coolest shit on the internet right now. So good.

damienmaloney:
summer vacation for sale
hi friends i made a zine out of photos that I took last summer.  edited and designed by the fantastic george mccalman.  it is very personal and includes some writing that came from my heart.  it is 11.25 x 15in, 16 pages, full color on newsprint.  i will mail one to you for $6 + $3 shipping for a deal of $9 (in the US).  if you’re outside the US email me.
you can order these here

damienmaloney:

summer vacation for sale

hi friends i made a zine out of photos that I took last summer.  edited and designed by the fantastic george mccalman.  it is very personal and includes some writing that came from my heart.  it is 11.25 x 15in, 16 pages, full color on newsprint.  i will mail one to you for $6 + $3 shipping for a deal of $9 (in the US).  if you’re outside the US email me.

you can order these here

jennilee:

Thanks for the interview Citizens of Humanity Brand Magazine. If you can find an issue be sure to pick it up - it’s a beautiful large scale well made publication.

"There are plenty of stolen moments. A car’s windshield reflecting a dreamy light. A cigarette in a puddle of leaves. Three pretzels stacked on a vendor’s cart. The Vancouver-based photographer describes her work as “quiet, aware and unassuming.” She adds, “Intimate and distant at the same time. ” Her work is deceptively simple. To capture the mundane and the magical at the same time is a talent. “I think that a lot of my photos capture a familiar yet specific truth that is common to everyone,” she says. “Something that you can look back to and feel at that moment in time, everywhere and everyday”

London SE8 3JF

My incredibly talented friend, Lydo Elise Le is featured on Self Publish, Be Happy. She’s also on Instagram.

My incredibly talented friend, Lydo Elise Le is featured on Self Publish, Be Happy. She’s also on Instagram.

VITSΠ621 Side Table

The table, now injection-molded in Britain, was originally designed by Dieter Rams in 1962 along with his 620 Chair Program.

It was last produced in the 1980s and is typical of Rams’s constant quest – at Braun and Vitsœ – to elevate plastic, as he said, to be “a noble and long-living material.”

The addition of adjustable feet satisfies Rams’s wish that was never fulfilled by the original table in the 1960s.

(Source: inventorymagazine.com)